The Essex Churches Site

 

THE ESSEX CHURCHES SITE

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St Peter and St Paul, Little Horkesley

Little Horkesley

 

Click on the 'play' symbol in the second image to see all my photographs of this church as a slide show, then click on any image in the slideshow to see it large in a new page.

Alternatively, if you don't have flash enabled, you can go straight to the set for this church on flickr.

Open, and less than a mile from neighbouring Great Horkesley. This is a must-see. The medieval church was struck by a 500lb parachute mine in the summer of 1940. The mine fell right into the interior of the church, where it exploded. The result was devastating - the building was wiped out, as was everything for 500 yards, including the village pub. The debris was scattered over a wide area - part of the shattered bell from the tower was found at Wissington, three miles away!

The church was rebuilt in 1957, and the effect is not unpleasing. There is some excellent modern glass. More to the point, however, is what was rescued from the ruins. This is the biggest double figure brass in England, as well as three life size 13th century wooden effigies. There is also a triple figure brass, so all in all it must have been quite a church before the destruction.

I liked it a lot, it still has the feel of a village church, a bit like Chelmondiston a few miles off in Suffolk, which suffered a similar fate, but it has the space and openness of the contemporary restorations of London City churches.

Simon Knott, October 2012

               

 

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home - index - latest - e-mail
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Norfolk churches - Suffolk churches
www.simonknott.co.uk