The Essex Churches Site

 

THE ESSEX CHURCHES SITE

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St Mary, Maldon

Maldon St Mary

 

Click on the 'play' symbol in the second image to see all my photographs of this church as a slide show, then click on any image in the slideshow to see it large in a new page.

Alternatively, if you don't have flash enabled, you can go straight to the set for this church on flickr.


We took the wrong turning at the roundabout after leaving Danbury and were halfway to London before either of us noticed. Fortunately, that's an exaggeration, but it took a feat of mapreading to work out where we were in the lattice of narrow lanes and get us back on the right road to Maldon, where down at the quayside St Mary waited for us in the rain.

Open. This is a traditionalist Anglo-catholic church, as the sign at the gate reading <i>The Sacrament of Reconciliation is offered here - a Priest is always available to hear your confession</i> might suggest. There are two churches in Maldon, All Saints up in the town which is very low, and this at the quayside which is very high. There is a terrific view of the Blackwater estuary, and moored below the churchyard was the wherry Hydrogen, which I often see moored on Wherry Quay at the bottom of my road in Ipswich.

The materials of this church are a pleasing mix of red brick and flint. It would be difficult to photograph it from the north or east other than from on board a boat, unfortunately. However, there is an excellent octagonal extension to the south. I wandered around the churchyard, protecting my lens from the drizzle, and wishing there were sunlight on all that lovely Essex brick. You step into a church which is by no means a neat anglo-catholic temple - indeed, it is rather a rough and ready barn of a place - but it is pleasingly furnished with Anglo-catholic decorations collected from other churches. Apparently, the Priest here used to be the Diocesan Furnishings Officer, and had first dibs on anything going! There is a rather alarming window commemorating the Battle of Maldon. But generally, I liked it a lot, and although we were away from the High Street there was a succession of people coming in and out. As I stood lighting a candle to Our Lady of Maldon the sun came out, and so I went outside and circumnavigated the church again with my camera.

And then back up into the busy town. All Saints on the High street is apparently only open on Saturdays, and as I did not want to waste time pursuing a key it was onwards across the river to Heybridge, the industrial and commercial quarter of Maldon, and, incidentally, home to successful non-league side Heybridge Swifts.

Simon Knott, October 2012

               

 

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home - index - latest - e-mail
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Norfolk churches - Suffolk churches
www.simonknott.co.uk